The Design Company.

You can change this area in header.php

Special Sidebar

You can add any content in this area by go to
Admin->Design->Widgets->Sidebar4

Archive for June, 2013

Roses for the Queen

Hershey's 60th anniversary logo appeared on stationery, brochures and other advertising materials.  1963

Hershey’s 60th anniversary logo appeared on stationery, brochures and other advertising materials. 1963

 

1963 was filled with special events.  The community celebrated its 60th anniversary with new attractions (Highmeadow Campground, now Hersheypark Camping Resort), new streetlights in the shape of Hershey’s Kisses, parades and an Anniversary Rose Queen.

 

Hershey Anniversary Rose Queen float was featured in the Fireman's Parade.  June 15, 1963

Hershey Anniversary Rose Queen float was featured in the Fireman’s Parade. June 15, 1963

 

Hershey had started the tradition of selecting a rose queen in 1953, as part of its 50th anniversary celebration.  That year, preliminary contests were held throughout Pennsylvania.  The final competition was held in the Arena.

 

As part of the 60th anniversary celebration, Hershey again crowned a Rose Queen.

 

Peggy Evans (center) was crowned Hershey's Rose Queen on May 5, 1963.  Her court included Maryanne Nemocovsky (left)and Suzanne Hershey (right).  5/5/1963

Peggy Evans (center) was crowned Hershey’s Rose Queen on May 5, 1963. Her court included Maryanne Nemocovsky (left)and Suzanne Hershey (right). 5/5/1963

 

The 1963 competition was a much more local event, with all the candidates selected from students at Hershey Junior College and Hershey High School.  The competition was held at Hershey Rose Garden on May 5.  Peggy Evans, a Hershey Junior College freshman was selected Queen in time to reign over the community’s 60th anniversary events, beginning with the Tulip Garden festival.

 

Hershey News, front page,  5/5/1963

Hershey News, front page, 5/5/1963

 

The May 16, 1963 article in the Hershey Press noted that the contestants were judged on personality, charm, poise, grace, pleasantness of voice, good English diction, carriage, congeniality, beauty and ability to create a picture of good taste.  Quite a list of attributes!

 

First runner up in the contest was Suzanne Hershey, a Hershey High School senior, and second runner up was Maryanne Nemcovsky, a Hershey Junior College sophmore.  The Queen’s court also included Marilyn Buck, Patricia Horst, Sally Kindt, Karen Naylor and Nancy DeAngelis.

 

You scream, I scream, We all scream for ice cream!

Hershey Creamery was a popular stop for ice cream during a visit to Hershey.  ca.1940

Hershey Creamery was a popular stop for ice cream during a visit to Hershey. ca.1940

 

When the outdoor temperature rises, ice cream comes immediately to mind.  Thankfully, Hershey has always been a place to get great homemade ice cream.  Milton Hershey believed in finding a use for everything.  The Hershey Chocolate factory needed skimmed milk for making milk chocolate.  The Lebanon Creamery, which opened in  1905 processed the milk for shipping to the factory and bottled milk and cream for retail sales.  It also made cottage cheese and ice cream.  When a creamery or “model dairy” was built in Hershey in 1929, it also began processing milk for retail sale.  Located next to Hershey Park it was a popular destination for Park visitors, Ballroom dancers and swimmers at Hershey Park Pool.

 

Fred Mazzoli, interviewed in 1990 for the Archives’ oral history program, had many memories of making ice cream at the Hershey Creamery.  He started out at the creamery in 1932 as a 14 year old working a summer job.  He had a knack for fixing machines and for making ice cream.

 

Listen to his story:

 

 

 

Audio transcript:

Well, first of all, I was pretty handy with machinery up in the factory [sic] [creamery].  They had an Eskimo pie machine, and they could never get it to work.  So there was a fellow that we knew, a fellow by the name of Capreni.  He worked in the creamery, because he had worked in the creamery in the factory.  So they sent him down to the Hershey creamery department to work because he knew something about the machinery.  So he got me a job and I went to work there.  In no time at all, they needed somebody to make ice cream, so I took up the ice cream.  They made it in some departments there.  From there we started making Eskimo pies, and I was handy with the mechanic part of the Eskimo pie machine.  That’s how I started making ice cream. 

 

I went to Penn State for a couple of weeks, for instruction, something like that, in creamery work, but when I went up there, I had started decorating ice cream with whipped cream.  When I went up there, I was doing this decorating, and that gave them another idea to teach up there.  So I really was hired down there to operate the Eskimo pie machine, and from then on I took over that whole ice cream department, and I was in charge of the ice cream department until I quit and come up here and work here [Mazzoli Ice Cream].