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Archive for April, 2014

Hershey’s Syrup: Chocolate goodness in a tin

It wasn’t until 1926 that Hershey Chocolate Company began manufacturing and marketing chocolate syrup. When Hershey’s Syrup was first introduced, it was marketed to commercial users (i.e. bakers, soda fountains, restaurants).  Commercial chocolate syrup was marketed in two strengths: single and double.  Single strength was promoted for use in soda fountain pumps for making carbonated beverages.  Double strength was used for use as a topping and in milk drinks.

 

Hershey's Syrup label, 18 oz. 1933

Hershey’s Syrup label, 18 oz. 1933

 

In late 1928, salesmen’s requests led the company to package and market Hershey’s single strength chocolate syrup for home use.  It was packaged in two sizes: 5 ½ oz. and 18 oz. metal tins.  In 1934 the 18 oz. size was reduced to 16 oz and marketed as a 1 pound tin.  Labels incorporated the iconic Hershey block letter design.

 

Hershey's Syrup recipe pamphlet, 1936

Hershey’s Syrup recipe pamphlet, 1936

 

To help introduce the new product to consumers, Hershey Chocolate hired a public relations/marketing firm, N.W. Ayer & Son, to help with the launch.  Hershey also hired a noted home economist, Caroline King, to develop 12 recipes using syrup.  The recipes and syrup samples were distributed to “home institutes” and magazines, including Good Housekeeping Delineator, People’s Home Journal, McCall’s Magazine, Women’s Home Companion, Liberty and Conde Nast Publications.  Initial results were positive and publications printed recipes and articles about Hershey’s new product.

Here’s a page of recipes from one of those early recipe pamphlets:

Recipes using Hershey's Syrup, ca.1928-1933

Recipes using Hershey’s Syrup, ca.1928-1933

Fore! Origins of the Hershey Country Club

In 1928, Milton Hershey authorized the construction of two new golf courses for Hershey.  The first course was located next to Hershey Park and was named the Hershey Parkview course.  Parkview was a public course, open to all golfers.  The second course was laid out on land surrounding Milton Hershey’s home, High Point.  This course incorporated the remaining holes of Hershey’s first  9-hole golf course that had been established in 1908.  Over the years, the chocolate factory’s continual expansion had consumed the original course bit by bit so that by the 1920s only 5 or 6 holes remained.

 

In April 1930 Milton Hershey invited one hundred guests to a luncheon held at the new Hershey Country Club.

In April 1930 Milton Hershey invited one hundred guests to a luncheon held at the new Hershey Country Club.

 

In April 1930, Milton Hershey sent an invitation to one hundred people in Hershey, inviting them to a luncheon to be held at his home, which was being remodeled to serve as a clubhouse for the new country club.  As part of the remodeling, Milton Hershey reserved the second floor of the house as his personal apartment.

 

Before lunch was served, Milton Hershey greeted his guests and invited them to look under their plates.  Underneath each plate was a charter membership card for each guest.

 

High Point Mansion served as the clubhouse for Hershey Country Club from 1930-1970.

High Point Mansion served as the clubhouse for Hershey Country Club from 1930-1970.

In 1970 a new clubhouse was built along East Derry Road.

In 1970 a new clubhouse was built along East Derry Road.

 

High Point served as the clubhouse for the Hershey Country Club until 1970 when the new East course  opened and new clubhouse was constructed along East Derry Road.